European Spa Tour Part 4: Rehabilitation in Switzerland

Just tuning into my European Spa Tour series? Click here to start from the beginning and catch up!

Of all the stops on our tour, I’m most appreciative of the opportunities to tour two rehabilitation centers and learn how massage therapy is integrated into the fabric of healthcare in some European countries. For our first stop, we toured the Reha Clinic in Bad Zurzach, Switzerland with our guides Thomas and Julia. Julia trained as a massage therapist in Florida 25 years ago, but that training did not qualify her to practice massage when she returned to Switzerland. In Switzerland, she practices the Trager method. In the United States, many massage therapists know this as one kind of approach to massage or techniques they integrate into their traditional settings. Some of the East Village Spa therapists integrate similar techniques into sessions. In Switzerland, it is a more widely-recognized therapy and according to Julia, it is 80% covered by insurance. (Click here for a brief explanation of the Trager approach).

American Massage Therapists and our Swiss Hosts Thomas and Julia at Reha Clinic

The rehabilitation clinic was in a complex with a large pool and sauna facility that was open to the public and used by patients. The clinic itself was for stays of 2 weeks to 4 months with some outpatient care. I would compare it to a place people would go in America after a joint replacement surgery or hip fracture when they needed intensive therapy but not long term care.  The facility employs 13 licensed massage therapists (Plus physical therapists, doctors, and nurses) and additional technicians to do wraps for patients being treated for lymphedema.

I was most excited to learn how massage therapy is covered by the national insurance plans in Europe. As far as I understood, medical massage is covered in treatments like the Reha clinic, but the massages are quite different than what my clients and the typical massage therapy client would expect and if I’m being honest, they are probably not what the majority of our clients would want for their routine massage therapy, but these sessions would be immensely helpful in a rehabilitation setting.

L-R: Thomas shows us how they make their saline towels for hot compress treatments, The massage treatment rooms in the new wing, and some of the treatment tables in the therapy center. Quite different than the atmosphere many Americans think of and prefer for massage.

Probably the coolest feature of the facility was their therapy garden. I initially assumed that this served as a place to practice physical and occupational therapy exercises or that the herbs grown were used in preparations, but I was absolutely delighted to learn that the primary purpose was chronic pain relief. According to our guide “Patients who are in pain forget the things that are not pain. They work in the garden to forget their pain and get new ideas.”

The following are the answers to my 3 most burning questions for our guides about what it is like to work as a massage therapist in a setting like their clinic.

Q: What kind of training is required for massage therapists in a facility like yours?

A: Typical is about 2 years of full-time (40 hours/week) study to become a licensed massage therapist. A relaxation or spa therapist can learn basic “feel-good” massage in about 2-3 weekends, but relaxation massage is not covered by insurance and isn’t licensed. Relaxation massages are out-of-pocket expenses. According to our tour guides, the licensed medical massage therapists respect the spa and relaxation massage therapists and see a need for their services as well.

Q: What type of services do the medical massage therapists offer and how do their services fit into the comprehensive medical treatment?

A: Medical massage therapists work as a treatment team with the physical therapists, doctors, and nurses to deliver rehabilitation treatments including aquatic therapy. They can offer hydrotherapy baths and exercises, and also perform treatments with tens units and lymphatic drainage machines. Therapists use saline (salt) wraps and hot packs. Our guide said “Massage therapists decide when a patient needs treatment like a tens unit. The massage therapist will call up the doctor and suggest it.”

Left: Warm water pools for aquatic rehabilitation. Right: Hydrotherapy tubs that massage therapists could use for treatments.

Our guides said that the types of treatments are generally prescribed by standard guidelines depending on the condition they’re being referred for (i.e. how many hours of massage, aquatic therapy, exercise, physical therapy, etc…). For example, before a patient comes to the clinic to recover from a hip replacement, he gets a plan of care. The treatment team meets weekly for an hour to discuss about 30 patients in their care and their schedule of therapies. Massage sessions are typically 25 minutes long except for lymphatic drainage therapy for lymphedema which usually consists of a 30 minute morning session and a 60 minute evening session.

Q: What kind of ambiance (lighting and music) do you provide for massages?

A: (Confused looks from our guides). “Why would we play music?” We laughed. The massage rooms are stark and brightly lit, patients bring the sheets from their rooms with them to the massage therapy room unless they are paying extra out-of-pocket for special care. I love the idea of “why would they need extra sheets? They have sheets on their bed!”

Q: What is a typical workday like?

A: Perhaps a team meeting to discuss patient care, a full day of back-to-back prescribed sessions with about 2 minutes in between to do notes and clean your table and supplies, a short lunch break. A typical day for a massage therapist in their clinic is far busier and more fast-paced than for most American massage therapists I know, especially because the sessions are so short and they see so many patients.

My takeaway:

I LOVE that massage therapy training in Switzerland is so comprehensive! I have always wished that we had tiered licensing in the United States for therapists who wish to progress into a more medical/treatment oriented setting v. therapists who wish to provide relaxation and stress-relief massage only. I was glad to return to our clients and report that “Yes, massage IS covered by their national healthcare, but not the kind of massage therapy that you are accustomed to and only when prescribed for a particular ailment.” I suppose a benefit of not having massage covered under American insurance is that we can completely customize treatments for our clients and make sessions relaxing, therapeutic, and exactly what our clients want on a given day.

Overall, because of the amount of training for therapists in the medical settings and the very low requirement of training in the spa and relaxation settings, it is hard to accurately compare Swiss and American massage therapists or make accurate professional comparisons, but this tour was probably the highlight of my trip and I’m glad our hosts were able to take time out of their busy therapy schedules to visit with us!

Click here to keep reading! Part 5: Austrian “Kur,” Radon Pools, and Spa Massage

 

 

Managing Workplace Stress

One of my best friends had been solidly in the “Massage is weird, I’ll never get a massage” camp for years. He finally confessed that this year he tried massage and has been getting them regularly ever since. I asked him what prompted him to try, when all of my prodding for years didn’t convince him. His reply “work was getting to be too much and I didn’t know what else to do to manage it.”

Even if you love your job, work can be stressful! In fact, 65% of Americans cited work as the #1 contributor to stress in their lives (2012 APA’s Annual Stress in America Study). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has increased focus on stress as a workplace safety and health concern.

Even working in a spa, which would seem to be a low-stress job (to people who don’t work in a spa!) requires our team to carefully monitor their emotions and manage stress levels, both at home and at work. We see people at their most vulnerable and need to be sure we can be calm and present with them so we’ve become not only experts in relieving stress for others, but in practicing self care to keep our stress at bay and not absorb the stress from clients we’re working with.

At the spa, we hear anecdotal evidence from our guests that stressful issues at work (unclear demands, limited growth opportunities, time management concerns, supervisors, even workplace bullies) are a main reason they visit the spa. While our providers can’t change your work situation, we can offer coping mechanisms. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) studied the effects of massage therapy on ICU nurses and found statistically significant benefits to nurses who received massage therapy to manage stress over those who did not.

A Canadian pilot study of seated workplace massage showed short-term benefits of 20 minute weekly seated massage on employees in stressful work environments and suggested further research is needed to see long-term benefits of such a program. The Touch Research Institute of Miami showed that a 15 minute chair massage was more beneficial than a typical 15 minute break in reducing anxiety and also improved cognitive performance. Forbes recommends that executives regularly receive massage to reduce workplace stress, increase productivity, and increase sleep.

Work stress is serious! Don’t take it from us, take it from the American Psychological Association. This is a great article on tips to manage your work stress from the pros.

When it feels like too much, sometimes a visit to the spa can help you feel like yourself again, whether it is a stress relieving massage, facial, or both. Learn more about our services or schedule time to refresh and de-stress here.

 

FAQ: When should I come back?

A question we’re frequently asked is: How often should I get a (insert your favorite spa service here)? As far as how often you should get spa services, it depends on the service and why you are receiving it.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I GET A FACIAL?

  • For general relaxation and routine skin wellness: typically a monthly facial will suffice, though we understand sometimes you have to stretch it out to every other month or quarterly. As long as you are using the products your esthetician recommends in between visits you should be fine. At a minimum, each season it is good to get checked out in case you need to change your routine due to changes in the weather and your activities.
  • For peels or Minus 10 protocols: you will need to visit in shorter intervals (perhaps 2-3 weeks) based on the treatment goal and where in your skin cell turnover cycle your esthetician wants you to repeat the service.
  • For acne facials like our “Clear Relief” facial: a monthly facial to assess skin, perform extractions, and do a deeper cleanse along with recommended home care between visits is necessary until the acne clears up.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I GET A MASSAGE?

You can typically get massage therapy as often as you’d like, but any of us who have spent a day getting massage in school or testing massage students or job applicants can attest that there IS such a thing as too much massage! Your body will let you know when you’ve had enough! A few good suggestions for spacing your services:

  • General stress management and relaxation massages: These are fine in whatever interval you can manage with your schedule. We have clients in weekly (sometimes twice weekly), lots of every other week and monthly massage clients, as well as some who are able to treat themselves on special occasions like birthdays and anniversaries.
  • Sports massage: If you’re training for an event, regular massage at weekly or every-other week intervals are helpful to prevent injury and keep you on your training schedule. The type of massage your therapist recommends during training, shortly before an event (1-2 days) and shortly after an event will have different session goals, techniques, and duration.
  • Injury or specific focus work massages: The frequency will vary for these services based on what you and your therapist are addressing. It is possible to overwork an area and for most kinds of massage, we don’t want to further inflame an area so your therapist will suggest rest periods between massage. Typically we’d ask a client to come more frequently at the beginning of treatment for a specific issue until it has subsided (2 sessions in a week is not uncommon at this stage), then maintenance massages. Your therapist will gauge frequency based on how long the benefits of the treatment seem to last.
  • If you are seeing multiple providers to treat the same condition: We often partner with chiropractors and physical therapists for greater treatment effectiveness. Do make sure your massage therapist knows all of the treatments you’re receiving for the injury or health concern (i.e. physical therapy, chiropractic, acupuncture, etc…) and make sure your other providers know you’re receiving massage so you don’t over treat a condition and all providers are on the same page with scheduling service frequency.

HOW OFTEN DO I NEED TO WAX?

Wax intervals vary greatly depending on the person, hair texture, ethnicity, hormones, and heredity play a role in how often you’ll need to book your follow-up waxes. It is important to grow hair to at least 1/4 inch before waxing to make sure the hair catches in the wax.

  • Facial waxing:Typically 3-4 weeks is common between waxing for brows, upper lip, and chin.
  • Brazilian/bikini, back and chest waxing: 4-6 weeks is a typical interval for Brazilian, back, and chest waxing.
  • Leg waxing: Leg hair needs a bit more time to grow in enough to wax, most people need to go 6-8 weeks once their hair is on a good growth schedule.

Are you ready for a rebook or looking to schedule your first service? Learn more and book online. Don’t hesitate to give us a call with your questions at (515) 309-2904.

 

 

5 “Awkward” summer issues to mention to your spa provider

We’ve all been there, you show up for a spa service and realize you are wearing your stinky sandals, or you spent a day at a pool party and got some extra sun a couple of days before your massage. The good news is it is fine, and expected, for our guests to mention these and other common summer issues to their provider BEFORE the session so we can make accommodations!

Stinky Feet Situations:

If you are worried your feet are not as fresh as they could be and it is going to bother you so much that you can’t just relax, it is fine to mention it to your provider before hand! While you’re getting ready, they can prepare some hot towels with tea tree oil to freshen up your feet so you can relax into your session! Other spas and massage therapists are likely to have solutions as well.

Plantar Warts:

Tell your therapist if you have plantar warts, especially because some rooms are pretty dark and we don’t always see them. While plantar warts are not super likely to spread between people in a massage situation, we don’t want to spread on your feet and we know they might be painful to massage. Your therapist can also do deep compression work on your feet or hit reflex points through a sheet over the immediate area (assuming it isn’t painful) so not to worry, you’ll still get a great foot massage and we promise we won’t be weirded out! (Get more info about plantar warts here.)

Post-sun flaking skin:

Summer is the season of “bonus exfoliation” in massage treatments. Dry, sun-exposed skin will sometimes ball up as we massage the back, but fear not because we have a solution. Once this starts, we’ll add some extra oil to the back and buff it with a dry towel, this usually takes care of the layer of dead skin so we can get back to massage! If you suspect this will happen, let us know in advance so we can start the session this way and your massage can have a better flow to it. If you have big pieces of peeling skin or a serious burn, that is different. In that case, it is best to reschedule your massage with plenty of advanced notice or ask your therapist to avoid the area.

Foot or nail fungus:

Let your therapist know before the service starts. While people with a healthy immune system have better luck avoiding person-to-person infection from a fungus, people who are pregnant or who have certain health concerns may be especially susceptible to infection so they will want to avoid the area or work with gloves. If you are booking a nail service but have a nail fungus, your nail technician can complete all of the service safely except that if you want polish, you will have to bring your own or purchase a bottle of polish and any base or top coat you wish to have used for the safety of other guests. Unfortunately, a pedicure can’t cure a fungal infection. Learn more here.

Mystery Rashes:

If you have a rash that is more than on just one small area of the body away from where your therapist or esthetician will be working, please reschedule your service. If you have poison ivy, you definitely need to reschedule! The risk of transmitting poison ivy to your therapist and to many clients they see is too great. Please give as much notice as possible and believe us, we’ll thank you for rescheduling. Click here for our blog post on poison ivy.

Whew, see, that wasn’t so awkward, was it? It is important to have an open dialogue with your massage therapist, esthetician, and nail technicians. They are experts at what they do and are eager to help you feel comfortable, but they need good communication and feedback from you to make that possible. Ready to schedule a visit? Click here!

 

Get to know Julie, Licensed Massage Therapist

julieJulie Accola joined our massage team in 2016.  She has spent much of her career as a Registered Nurse, so massage is a career change for her.  She continues to provide nursing care in-home to children and is assisting our spa guests part time.

Julie has a great sense of humor and is frequently joking about her “big peasant hands” which provide an AWESOME and nurturing massage.  Thank you for taking the opportunity to get to know Julie!

How long have you been in the industry?

I received my massage license in 2014 after graduating from Body Wisdom School. (Julie has been a registered nurse since 1998!)

Why did you go into this field?

To relieve pain for people without a doctor’s order or a possible addiction to pain medications.

What is your favorite massage service to give?

I love doing head and neck massage and including Acupressure (Jin Shin Do) in sessions.

What is your favorite service to receive?

The same!

What is your favorite spa retail product?

The Kneipp sleep and pain relief aids work great without side effects.

What is your favorite way to reduce stress?

Prayer and meditation

What are your favorite suggestions for home care?

Drink plenty of water, rest, ice, and stretch as needed

What is your favorite relaxation or stress relief quotation?

If it no longer serves you, let it go.

What might clients find surprising about you?

I come from a very large family, the 9th of 12 kids raised on a dairy farm.  I’m a karaoke queen waiting for NASCAR to call…lol (Did we mention that Julie is hilarious?)

Why should clients visit YOU?

I have excellent assessment skills. I work with medium to firm pressure and can target your specific areas of concern.

To schedule your massage online with Julie, click here! You can also book at www.EVDaySpa.com

 

What your massage therapist is REALLY thinking!

Awhile back, a client asked me to blog on things that clients are too embarrassed to ask their massage therapists and wanted me to ask our therapists what they are *REALLY* thinking during potentially awkward situations.  Here goes:

Q: Do you prefer clients rest with their eyes open or closed when they are laying face up?

A: Closed! 100% vote closed. If your eyes are open, we worry you’ll be looking up our nose when we’re doing neck work and when we are doing a relaxation style massage, most of the time we’re in a zone and it is awkward if someone stares at us.

Q: Should I shave before a massage? Will you judge me if I don’t?

A: We don’t care. Honestly. We don’t shave for each other.  I personally say “Why should I shave my legs for my massage therapist if I’m not going to shave them for my husband?” Also, we are totally fine massaging people who have back hair. We’d far prefer to massage someone with a hairy back than someone who just attempted to shave their back and has cuts and ingrown hairs we need to work around.

massagethoughtsQ: My feet are gross, will my therapist judge me?

A: Most of us are in need of a good pedicure.  Don’t stress about chipped nail polish, calluses (shoot, runners and walkers NEED calluses!), or cosmetic issues. Feet are feet. They contain 26 bones, 33 joints and over 100 muscles/ligaments/tendons.  Things are bound to be wacky!

Q: I’m breastfeeding, what happens if I leak?

A: Don’t worry! We LOVE pampering new mamas.  We have plenty of towels, don’t be afraid to ask for one. We also have many tables that have breast cut-outs that are softer so please feel free to mention this at booking so we can ensure you’re scheduled in one of the rooms with cut-outs.

Q: What happens if I pass gas?

A: We won’t mention it if you don’t! And it just means you’re relaxed. We won’t go telling everyone because we likely won’t remember it by the time the session is over. P.S. Your therapist is afraid of passing gas during your session too!

massagethoughts2

Q: Do male clients ever get an erection?

A: Sometimes, it is natural. Usually the client is asleep and I’m guessing they don’t notice it. We prefer that if it happens, our client doesn’t bring attention to it. We certainly will not point it out.  We use sheets and a thick blanket for modesty. Please do not let this fear keep you from getting a massage.  Like passing gas, it is one of those things that if you don’t mention it, your therapist will have forgotten it by the time the session is over.

Q: What does “Undress to your comfort level” really mean? What does my therapist prefer?

A: We are fine with underwear off or on.  It is best if women remove bras.  If men leave on *longer boxers, we aren’t able to do some kinds of massage on the upper legs. If women have brief shape wear style underwear that go up farther on the back, it will make low back work trickier, but we can work around anything.  Glute work is easier sans undies, but if it makes you uncomfortable, please keep them on!  I’d say personally my clients are about 50/50 everything off/underwear on.

massagethoughtsNow that we’ve hopefully put your fears to rest, it is time to book your massage at East Village Spa! You can learn about our services here and when you’re ready to schedule, call (515) 309-2904 or book online!

 

You’re not cheating!

Imagine this:  You are about to leave for a weekend road trip with your friends and wake up with a crick in your neck.  You call the spa hoping to squeeze in a bit of pain relief with your therapist but he or she has the day off.  The receptionist suggests another great therapist, but you decline because you think you’ll hurt your therapist’s feelings.

When you return, you book with your regular massage therapist, tell them you were miserable on your trip, and they are shocked at how tense your neck and shoulders are from that painful road trip.  You need to book 3 weeks in a row just to feel normal again before you can get back on your monthly schedule.  Your therapist tells you they wish you’d have seen one of their colleagues for some relief before you left. After all, they trust them with their own massage therapy sessions and think they are great!

painWith summer so near, it is a good time to remind clients that our employees encourage you to see their colleagues for services to keep up with your progress.  We know your schedule gets crazier in the summer and our employees are also planning upcoming travel, races, and family events.  If they aren’t available when you need in, they want you to see one of their co-workers that they trust immensely with your care (and their own!)  Here’s why:

  • Our spa is a “team treatment” spa and the majority of our clients see multiple providers for more booking options and treatment styles to choose from.
  • We have been open almost 8 years and our experienced employees are fortunate that they don’t have to compete for bookings, they are always comfortably busy!
  • Our employees can rest easier when they plan a vacation or have an unexpected illness knowing that their regulars can keep on their treatment schedule with one of their co-workers.  Believe me, it stresses them out when planning a trip knowing someone they’ve been treating will skip a session (or complain that their therapist is leaving) rather than see a trusted colleague.
  • Our employees know that because they are all so busy, it is hard for clients to get in to see them as often as they need to.  We’d all rather have you see 2-3 people and get in on the schedule that is recommended than wait too long between services and not get the results you could.
  • You might find it beneficial to experience different styles of work or different opinions from other providers!  I personally have two therapists I book with at the spa when I need relaxation or want a hot stone massage, one therapist I book with for shoulder pain, and another I book with for general deep tissue.
  • Last but not least, our services providers care about you and hate to think you are in pain when they know someone who can help you!
No need for disguises! Most of our clients see multiple providers, we won't be upset!

No need for disguises! Most of our clients see multiple providers, we won’t be upset!

Next time you can’t get in with your regular provider, let the front desk know specifically what you like about that person and we can pair you up with someone who has a similar approach instead of waiting longer than you or your body wants to between services. You might also ask your regular provider who he or she would recommend if you ever need to get in when they aren’t available. Click here to learn about our skilled treatment team and click here to book your next appointment!

P.S. Our team had a good laugh at this picture, because it sometimes feels pretty accurate!

massagevacation

 

Can spa services offer benefits for Raynaud’s Disease?

Some people experience periods of time when their fingers or toes turn color to white or blue and go numb.  This phenomenon is called Raynaud’s disease and it is fairly common, affecting 5-10% of the population.

What is Raynaud’s Disease?

My typical post cool weather run "trick" when a couple of my fingers turn white and go completely numb."

My typical post cool weather run “trick” when a couple of my fingers turn white and go completely numb.”

Raynaud’s disease is a condition characterized by periods of time when the fingers or toes (sometimes nose and ears) turn color and go numb due to an interruption of blood flow to the extremities due to a vasospasm (Mayo Clinic).  Often they will turn white, sometimes blue, and then red when blood flow returns.  Typically people with Reynaud’s feel numbness in the affected areas during an episode and may experience pain when blood flow returns.  The most common cause of a flare up is exposure to cold, though sometimes people experience the phenomenon during times of stress.

Raynaud’s may be primary (meaning it isn’t due to an underlying cause) or secondary (the phenomenon is due to a condition such as nerve damage, carpal tunnel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis or lupus.).  According to Mayo Clinic, some medications can also cause the Raynaud’s phenomenon.

The majority of people who experience Raynaud’s symptoms do not report it to a physician, (Raynauds.org) but it is worth noting at your next medical visit as occasionally Raynaud’s disease presents before a more serious disorder.

Nails may turn blue during an episode and over time,  nails might develop ridges related to Raynaud's.

Nails may turn blue during an episode and over time, nails might develop ridges related to Raynaud’s.

Can spa treatments help with Raynaud’s disease?

While I could not find research on spa services and Raynaud’s disease, some services may help with some of the causes and help to reduce some of the symptoms.

  • Deep tissue or orthopedic massage may be able to help people with wrist, arm, and hand injuries (like carpal tunnel) that may be contributing to the Raynaud’s phenomenon.
  • Hot stone massages will likely feel great and boost circulation for individuals who are perpetually cold, but aren’t going to “cure” Raynaud’s phenomenon.
  • If you notice an increase in Raynaud’s phenomenon at times of emotional stress, you might consider regular massage or spa services you enjoy that have been shown to lower stress.
  • If you are self conscious about the way your nails look as a result of Raynaud’s disease (sometimes nails can become “spooned” or develop ridges) a professional manicure and application of a shimmer or glitter polish can help to disguise any nail disfiguration due to the Raynaud’s.
  • Products like Kneipp mineral baths are great to purchase for an at-home spa experience to warm up during a flare-up.  I personally use the Kneipp mineral baths after every cooler-weather run to relax my muscles and bring blood flow back to my hands and feet.

Can spa services trigger Raynaud’s phenomenon?

Spa services aren’t likely to trigger Raynaud’s phenomenon unless you get cold.  It would be wise to let your provider know any concerns.  Options to make sure your hands and feet don’t get too cold:

  • Ask if you can keep your socks on during a massage until the therapist works on your feet (I usually do this!)
  • Ask for an extra blanket on hand in the room.
  • During pedicures or manicures, after a soak in water, ask for your foot or hand to be wrapped in a towel so it isn’t exposed to air
  • Cut the toes off of a pair of old socks and bring them to put on before your nail technician polishes your nails.  While your toes will be exposed, at least your feet will be warmer while your polish dries.  You can cut the finger tips off of an inexpensive pair of “one-size-fits-all” stretch gloves for a winter manicure.
  • After a service like a body wrap or hot stone massage, make sure to have plenty of warm clothes and gloves (especially in winter) or grab a cup of hot tea to hold after your service so you aren’t shocked by a temperature change.

If you are one of many of us who experience discomfort from Raynaud’s, don’t be afraid to speak up when getting a massage, skin care, or nail care service!  Your provider will be happy to make adjustments because he or she wants to make sure you can get full enjoyment and benefit from their work without worrying about your fingers and toes going numb!

Resources:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/raynauds-disease/basics/causes/con-20022916

http://www.raynauds.org/

http://www.nailsmag.com/article/82109/what-is-raynaud-s-disease

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3721961/

Get to know Camdine Cox, LMT

Camdine CoxWe are happy to introduce you to our newest team member, Camdine (Pronounced “Cam-den,” she also goes by “Cami”) Cox, Licensed Massage Therapist.  Camdine joined our team in February 2016, but her massage career started long before we were fortunate enough to cross paths!

How long have you been in the industry?

I have been a licensed massage therapist since 2009

Why did you go into massage therapy?

I have always loved helping people and making them feel better.  When I was little, I used to massage clients’ hands at my grandmother’s beauty salon  while their hair dried.  I love cooking and took a year of culinary school at DMACC but realized I’d be working odd hours in the culinary field.  I got my massage license to help work my way through college, but I fell in love with it!  I love being able to take away someone’s pain and get them back to what they love doing.

What is your favorite service to give?

My favorite massage to give is the sports massage.  I have learned a technique from Dr. James Mally that he refers to as “pin and stretch.” It allows me to work with tight, shortened muscles using range of motion and pressure.  I have found this approach very effective.

What is your favorite spa service to receive?

My favorite massage to receive is the hot stone massage.  One stroke with the stone is equivalent to seven with the hand.  It allows the therapist to work deeper faster and without having to use as much pressure.

What is your favorite retail product?

The Farmhouse Fresh honey glaze.  It smells amazing and works great on dry skin.

What is your favorite way to reduce stress?

I love to get lost in a book or listen to music.

What are your favorite suggestions or tips for clients?

Drink your water and stretch everyday.  You should drink your body weight, divided in half, in ounces of water daily.  Every night when you sleep, your body builds additional connective tissue over your muscles.  This binds you up and makes you stiff.  Stretching and massage helps to break this up.  You should stretch when you wake up and before you go to bed, ideally.

Do you have a special talent people might not know about?

I like to make jewelry and I can speak Spanish and French

Why should clients visit YOU?

I focus on relieving the cause of pain and stress through sports, prenatal, and hot stone massage.

To book a massage with Camdine, click here!

Get to know Jamee

JameeKoopmanMassageJamee Koopman, LMT, joined our team in 2015.  She is a graduate from Body Wisdom Massage Therapy School and Cassie’s former student.  We could not wait to recruit Jamee to join our team when she graduated because we knew our clients and colleagues would love working with her!  We are glad you are taking a moment to get to know her better and we know once you do, you’ll see why we just had to have her on the team!

How long have you been in the industry?

1 year

What are your licenses?

Certified Nursing Assistant, Certified Medical Assistant, and Licensed Massage Therapist

Why did you go into the field you are in?

I have spent 20 years in healthcare and I feel that massage therapy is a more hands-on approach to reach people on varied levels.

What is your favorite service to give?

Sports massage, though I’m open to integration of different techniques to tailor massage to specific needs.

What is your favorite service to receive?

Hot stone massage

What is your favorite spa retail product?

The Pure Inventions Tranquility Tea

What are your favorite ways to reduce stress?

Meditation, Qi Gong, and spending time outdoors

What are your favorite tips for clients?

I like to suggest stretches and acupressure points for my clients to use for self-care after their massage.

What are your favorite wellness resources?

I like to use every resource available, but my favorite is that gathered from getting treatments by my fellow massage therapists.

Do you have a favorite relaxation quote?

“When angry, count to four.  When very angry, swear.” ~Mark Twain

Do you have a  unique hobby people might not know about?

I find that the more coffee you drink in exotic locales, the more the human experience sinks in, and skills and knowledge evolve from there.

Why should clients visit YOU?

I understand that everyone’s circumstances and dispositions are extremely unique.  I simply wish to meet you where you are and provide the best therapy for what you need in your moment.

To book a massage with Jamee, click here!